Eating & Drinking

Grey Cup Grub Part II: Ottawa chefs share more recipes for your Redblacks party

Hosting a Grey Cup party this weekend? We talked to five Ottawa chefs about what they might serve to guests if they were hosting a get-together to cheer on the Redblacks.

On Friday we shared recipes from Chef Joe Thottungal at Coconut LagoonChef Briana Kim at Café My House and Chef Daniela Manrique at The Soca Kitchen.

Today we visit the kitchens of Chef Michael Moffat at Beckta and Chef Phil Denny at Belmont.

From Chef Michael Moffatt at Beckta:
Pork Pozole

A Redblacks season ticket holder, Chef Michael Moffatt will be watching Sunday’s game closely. His brothy stew combines a little heat with caramelized pork, vegetables, and hominy. Moffatt’s predicting an Ottawa win, and I predict that it would pair nicely with his pozole.

Chef Michael Moffatt of Beckta.
Chef Michael Moffatt’s pozole combines a little heat with caramelized pork, vegetables, and hominy. Photo by Katie Shapiro, OTTAWA magazine.

Beckta:
Pozole
Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup canola or vegetable oil
  • 3 lbs pork shoulder
  • 1 head garlic, peeled and separated into cloves
  • 2 tablespoons cumin powder
  • 1 bunch fresh oregano
  • 3 onions, sliced
  • 2 whole fresh jalapeños
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 4 bell peppers, chopped
  • 1 potato, peeled and cubed
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 4 cups white hominy, drained and rinsed
  • salt and black pepper to taste
Chef Michael Moffat's pozole. Photo by Katie Shapiro, OTTAWA magazine.
Chef Michael Moffat’s pozole. Photo by Katie Shapiro, OTTAWA magazine.

In a large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat.  Add pork and slowly caramelize on all sides.
Add 1 chopped onion and 2 celery stalks to brown off as well.
Add garlic, sweat briefly, then add cumin, oregano and jalapeños.
Add water to just cover and bring to a boil over medium heat, skimming off any foam that rises.
Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes or until pork pulls apart.
Remove meat and broth, strain and reserve both.
Pull the pork into shreds and return to broth.
Add the remaining ingredients except the hominy and salt and pepper.
Cook at a simmer, 15 to 20 minutes.
Stir in the hominy, degrease the stew, taste for seasoning, and serve in soup bowls.

To garnish, squeeze lots of lime juice onto each bowl, and top with chopped cilantro, shredded cabbage, and grated cheese.

Note: to reduce heat, jalapenos can be seeded and cayenne may be reduced or omitted.

From Chef Phil Denny at Belmont:
Braised Short Rib with Mole, Pinto Beans, Cheddar Hominy and Salsa Verde

These braised short ribs seem to be Chef Phil Denny’s take on a sort of elevated layer dip, if you will. The ribs are baked with the mole, beans, cheesy hominy, and then topped with salsa verde, green onions, cilantro, and more cheese for a combination of textures and spices that are sure to have you coming back for seconds.

belmont, braised ribs, chef phil denny (2)
You’ll be sure to score a touchdown with your guests if you serve Chef Phil Denny’s ribs baked with the mole, beans, cheesy hominy, and then topped with salsa verde, green onions, cilantro, and more cheese. Photo by Katie Shapio, OTTAWA magazine.

Belmont:
Braised Short Rib with Mole, Pinto Beans, Cheddar Hominy and Salsa Verde

For the braised short rib:

  • 2 kg (4.4lb) boneless short rib, or any other quality braising beef
  • 2 L beef or chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon cumin, toasted
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 head of garlic, cut through the cloves
  • 4 bay leaves
  • ¼ tsp chili flakes (optional)
  • salt and pepper
  • oil

Preheat oven to 325°F. In a pot bring all ingredients to a boil and let simmer for 10 minutes. While stock is heating generously season ribs with salt and pepper and sear in a heavy bottomed pan until well browned on all sides then transfer to a dutch oven or oven proof container with a tight fitting lid.

Pour hot stock over ribs, cover and braise in oven for 3 ½ – 4 hours. Remove from oven, uncover and let cool on a rack before transferring to fridge to cool overnight.

The next day remove ribs from stock, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and keep refrigerated until needed.

Transfer stock to a pot, heat until liquid and strain, reserving liquid.

belmont, braised ribs, chef phil denny (3)-1
Serve with tortilla chips to add some crunch. Photo by Katie Shapiro, OTTAWA magazine.

For the mole poblano:

  • 5 dried Ancho chilies, seeded (reserve seeds)
  • 2 cups hot water
  • 2 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • ½ tablespoon fennel seeds
  • ½ teaspoon peppercorns
  • 4 whole cloves
  • ½ stick cinnamon
  • 4 allspice berries
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 cups braising liquid from short ribs
  • ½ cup whole raw almonds
  • ¼ cup pepitas
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup roasted tomatillos, pureed
  • 1 cup puréed tomatoes
  • ¼ cup grated Mexican chocolate
  • small bouquet of marjoram and thyme
  • salt to taste

Pour hot water over seeded ancho chilies, and let stand for 15 minutes. While chilies are soaking, toast the reserved chili seeds and other spices together until aromatic. Combine all ingredients together in a heavy bottomed pot bring to a boil and let simmer for one hour, let cool then puree together in a blender.

For the salsa verde:

  • 2lbs fresh or canned tomatillos, drained
  • 2 large jalapeno peppers, stemmed
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • ½ cup chopped green onion
  • zest and juice from 2 limes
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar (only if using fresh tomatillos)
  • ½ cup olive oil plus 2 tablespoons for roasting
  • salt to taste

Heat oven to 375°F. In a roasting pan, drizzle tomatillos and jalapenos with 2 tablespoons olive oil and roast until tomatillos are splitting and soft, about ½ an hour, then let cool.
In a food processor with blade attachment, purée together roasted tomatillos, jalapenos, cilantro, green onion, lime zest and juice, and vinegar. With the food processor still running, add olive oil in a slow steady stream. Refrigerate until needed, up to two days.

For the hominy:

  • 4 cups hominy, soaked overnight, drained and rinsed
  • 4L water (approx. 16.5 cups)
  • 1 ½ tablespoon salt

Bring all ingredients to a boil together, then reduce heat and let simmer until hominy is soft but still toothsome, about 45 minutes. Strain and let cool before refrigerating until needed, up to two days.

For the pinto beans:

  • 900g (approx. 5 cups) pinto beans, soaked overnight, drained and rinsed
  • 1 head garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 8 kafir lime leaves, or the zest from two limes
  • 4 bay leaves
  • ½ stick cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon chili flakes
  • 2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoon salt
  • 4L (approx. 17 cups) water

Bring all ingredients to a boil together, reduce heat and let simmer for about 45 minutes. Strain and let cool. Remove lime leaves, bay leaves, and cinnamon stick before refrigerating until needed, up to two days.

To serve:

  • 5 cups grated extra old cheddar
  • ½ cup picked cilantro leaves
  • 1 cup sliced green onion
  • tortilla chips

Preheat oven to 375°F. With two forks or clean hands shred short ribs in a mixing bowl. Mix 4 cups of the grated cheddar with hominy, spread evenly on the bottom of a casserole or glass roasting pan, layer pinto beans over top of hominy, short ribs over pinto beans, mole over short ribs. Cover and bake for 30 minutes, remove cover and bake for an additional 10 minutes. Remove from oven let stand for 10 minutes.

Garnish with the remaining cup of grated cheddar, salsa verde, cilantro and green onion. Serve with tortilla chips.

belmont, braised ribs, chef phil denny (1) (1)
Spice up the salsa verde with jalapenos, cilantro, green onion, lime zest and juice, and vinegar — perfect. Photo by Katie Shapiro, OTTAWA magazine.