Going Out

ASK A LOCAL: 5 Ottawa personalities gush on favourite spots, biggest beefs, and hopes for the city

Jim Bryson 
Singer-songwriter

Why I came to Ottawa: I was born into Ottawa.

First Ottawa job: As a youth, I was an Ottawa Citizen paperboy.

My neighbourhood: Stittsville.

Most accurate Ottawa stereotype: I dare say we still occasionally live with a small chip on our shoulder regarding other, um, larger Canadian cities.

Least accurate Ottawa stereotype: The town that fun forgot.

Five words that describe Ottawa now: Hopeful, exciting, promising, changing, alive.

Five words you hope will be used to describe the city in 15 years: A place we still love.

Favourite spot: My wife would tell me to write the Manx in here, but may I also add Union Local 613, the Wellington Gastropub, and Jon Lomow’s newly renovated house? I don’t get out much, to be honest. My yard at night is pretty special as well.

Bruce White
Owner of ByTowne Cinema

Why I came to Ottawa: It was bigger than my small town, but not too big.

First Ottawa job: Getting the Stokes retail store ready to open in the then brand new Bayshore Shopping Centre, then selling things I knew nothing about.

My neighbourhood: New Edinburgh.

Most accurate Ottawa stereotype: Ottawans like to get to bed early on school nights.

Least accurate Ottawa stereotype: Ottawa’s lacking in arts and culture.

Proof I’ve made it in Ottawa: Tourists keep asking me for directions, so I must look as though I know my way around.

Five words that describe Ottawa now: One million potential ByTowne fans.

Five words I hope will be used to describe the city in 15 years: One million happy ByTowne fans.

Favourite spot: The theatre, seventh or eighth row from the front, aisle seat, beside my gal Karen.

 

Measha Brueggergosman
Opera singer

Why I came to Ottawa: My husband is studying at Algonquin College to be a paramedic.

First Ottawa job: Co-hosting the opening of Juno week with the mayor.

My neighbourhood: Prince of Wales and Fisher.

Most accurate Ottawa stereotype: It’s fricking freezing.

Least accurate Ottawa stereotype: There’s nothing to do.

Proof I’ve made it in Ottawa: That I’ve stood in line at Service Ontario half a dozen times.

Five words that describe Ottawa now: Understated, paradoxical, homegrown, conscious, livable.

Five words I hope will be used to describe the city in 15 years: Livable, unseasonably warm, construction-free, food mecca, and home to 15-time champions the Ottawa Senators.

Favourite spot: Bikram Yoga Ottawa on Bank Street.

 

Phil Jenkins
Writer

Why I came to Ottawa: I returned from Liverpool, England, in 1978, having left Ottawa for there in 1961. I came on an extended holiday to visit my roots, and I’m still here.

Current neighbourhood: The Gatineau Hills, halfway between Chelsea and Wakefield, in an observation post overlooking Ottawa. I first lived in Elmvale Acres, where I grew up, then Vanier, New Edinburgh, Sandy Hill, Ottawa East, the Glebe, Ottawa South.

Most accurate Ottawa stereotype: Developers run the town.

Least accurate Ottawa stereotype: That Ottawa is a city of stereotypes.

Five words that describe Ottawa now: Two steps forward, one back.

Five words I hope will be used to describe the city in 15 years: Greenest mayor in the country.

Favourite spot: The two blocks of Wellington Street between Holland Avenue and Harmer Avenue that contain the GCTC, a vegetarian restaurant, the best St. Vincent de Paul, and a Bridgehead.

 

Jeff Hunt
President of OSEG Sports

Why I came to Ottawa: I arrived as a teenager when my RCMP father got transferred here.

First Ottawa job: Carpet cleaner.

My neighbourhood: ByWard Market.

Most accurate Ottawa stereotype: Friendly.

Least accurate Ottawa stereotype: Boring.

Proof I’ve made it in Ottawa: Being profiled in Ottawa Magazine!

Five words that describe Ottawa now: Exciting, beautiful, diverse, growing, home.

Five words I hope will be used to describe the city in 15 years: World-class, more beautiful, more diverse, grown-up, and home.

Favourite spot: Lansdowne Park.