Print Magazine

INTERIORS 2014: River views inspire dazzling designs

1_Cover_jane.inddLETTER FROM THE EDITOR

When managing editor Sarah Brown proposed the theme of the 2014 Interiors issue, I was once again amazed at the rich architectural landscape of this city. The city’s explosion of bold, yet thoughtful, residential design provided us the opportunity to curate a collection of houses that easily fit the riverside theme.

The theme quickly revealed a few trends. Many homeowners love the modern look but wanted a house that spoke to the surroundings. Enter post-and-beam construction, which allows for open-concept kitchens and works well with neutral decor palettes. I love how, from afar, the Manotick home of Sebastien Marineau looks like a cluster of rural outbuildings. Inside, it’s warm, welcoming, and a luxurious place to come home to. Marc Gingras and Natalie Sawaya took a different route: the topography of their undeveloped property meant their house could be built to ensure awe-inspiring views.

One thing remains constant in these water-inspired homes, and that is the interplay between outside and inside. A pool is set into the bedrock and features clear fencing to keep the eyes on the prize-winning forested backdrop. Extensive glazing lets homeowners appreciate their surroundings even in winter. Barn- board reclaims the landscape by countering the modern aspects of the house and tying it back to the landscape, in this way honouring the surroundings.

I would even venture to say that the feeling of river travel — the sometimes peaceful, at other times stimulating experience that reveals something new at every turn — is reflected in this issue. For example, we learned of the Cumberland home of Anda Bruinsma and Barry Turner after visiting the home of Gosse Bruinsma, Anda’s brother. Gosse and his partner, Michele Carini, lovingly restored a heritage home in New Edinburgh — on the banks of the Rideau River, no less — and thus bring a different style of architecture to this issue. Serendipitous, indeed.

I’ve often marvelled at the fact that, while Ottawa has many parks and pathways situated near water, relatively few public gathering spaces take advantage of river views, sunset reflections, and the embracing spiritedness that comes with socializing by the water. But institutions are starting to see the value in inspired public spaces — “Building a More Beautiful City” spotlights three recent projects. Perhaps it’s time city planners took a cue from residential architects. How I would love a space to chat fireside about a new project or be moved by the musings of a celebrated speaker while taking in waterfront views.

Dayanti Karunaratne, Editor
feedbackottawa@stjosephmedia.com

FEATURES

Maximum Exposure
Upon discovering a hidden patch of cottage country within minutes of downtown, an ambitious couple set out to build a dream home that links inside and outside, past and present. The result is a piece of paradise on the Rideau, a home that is at once both sophisticated and exuberant
BY PATRICK LANGSTON; PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARC FOWLER

The View From the top
This family home starts with an astute real estate decision in 1991 and eventually leads, in 2013, to a Cantley retreat with glorious views of the Gatineau River
BY SARAH BROWN; PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER FRITZ

Mix and Match
A busy high-tech executive takes time out to help build his own piece of paradise along the Rideau River, a house that effortlessly balances traditional and contemporary, country and city
BY DANIEL DROLET; PHOTOGRAPHY BY GORDON KING

The Renaissance of the Bell House
It took a huge commitment to rescue this heritage property, a rambling frame building that had survived 142 years on the banks of the Rideau River. The vision and hard work of the new owners returned a grand old wreck to its former glory
BY JANET UREN; PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTIAN LALONDE

Human Nature
Situated on a forested slope overlooking the Ottawa River, this cottage-like retreat comprises a structure of three offset cubes, all the better to enjoy the best views from every room in the house
BY JANET UREN; PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARC FOWLER

COLUMNS
The city beautiful
Fresh ideas and a renewed focus on integrating art into architecture remind us just how beautiful — and fun — public buildings can be 

Keeping it surreal
The home of artist Diane Woodward, a self-described maximalist, is a fanciful wonderland where colour and cacophony rule 

Drawing rooms
Decor inspiration for every room in the house 

Sourcebook A tour through five amazing kitchens with details on how to achieve the look 

THIS CITY
• Fox fever • Artful items we long for • Stefan St-Laurent’s creative circles • Exhibiting war with Rémi Thériault • Weaving abstract art, from India to Main Street • Telling tales of high-end condos and ’hoods on the rise  31

GREAT TASTE

Most Wanted: Bespoke furniture  129

My Look: Serina Fraser and Jan Veer 130

FOOD
The Mondays Movement
plus City Bites: notable restaurant and food happenings

WINE
Designing your home cellar — plus best bottles for aging and investing

GOING OUT

Restaurants: Spotlight on Atelier, plus five new reviews of local restaurants

Calendar: War Horse • The wit and philosophy of Clement Layes • See, Hear, Read • Abstract photography at Atrium • Tensions revealed in Kim’s Convenience

OTTAWA JOURNAL
The art of imagining desire lines