Design

Know what this is? Ottawa inventors grind away at problem long-plaguing hikers

It looks like something from a chemistry lab, and in a way, it wouldn’t be out of place in that setting. But the setting it’s really intended for is the great outdoors. Bripe is a small copper apparatus that allows the user – presumably hikers or those looking to travel light – to brew up a small shot of coffee.

Reminiscent of how coffee is typically made throughout the Middle East (though Turkish coffee, for example, doesn’t use a filter, while Bripe has an ultra-fine filter), the user places the coffee grounds at the bottom of the shot glass-sized container and adds water. As part of the kit, Bripe’s makers cleverly supply a quad jet torch, the size and kind you might see chefs using to create that golden crust on creme brulee. This torch is used to heat the copper container, a metal specifically chosen not only for its light weight, but because it distributes heat evenly. In about a minute and a half, the coffee is joyously bubbling away, ready to satisfy that early morning craving (and avoid a headache in absence of caffeine). Simply suck it through the pipe.

No electricity, no campfire, no gas stove.

The Bripe can be adapted for finer or courser grinds (Want that espresso? You got it. Something more akin to a French press? Yep, that’s doable.) and once it’s hot, milk and sugar can be added.

Bripe is an Ottawa creation — the brainchild of Tim Panek and Craig Hall, the latter one of the co-founders of Equator Coffee Roasters. Both Panek and Hall have been long friends and, importantly, share a love of the outdoors. The inspiration for Bripe came, partly, out of Panek’s frustration with the bulkiness, complexity, and weight of other outdoor coffee-making products.

The result — Bripe is an ultra light, sturdy kit that only weighs 337 grams — it weighs less than a can of coke! It retails for $99.99.

Ottawa Magazine spoke with Craig Hall about their innovation:

You and Tim aren’t chemists are you? How did you go about dreaming up this apparatus?

Tim is actually a chemist. I am a coffee roaster. There are other methods of brewing coffee of course but all require that you have hot water first. This is the only device that ​you heat the water in it and do not need a kettle, etc.

How would Bripe fair in cold camping/hiking conditions? Do you envision this being used by ice fishermen, cross-country skiers, snowshoers?

Bripe will work well in the cold. Some heating devices may not work well in very cold conditions, but for most of our outdoor activities the Bripe and lighter should work well.

While it seems that Bripe can accommodate different types of coffee grounds, what kind works best?

A regular grind that you would use for drip coffee works well but a fine grind can also be used. Our basic recipe produces a strong shot of coffee that has a taste profile similar to a French press. The fine stainless steel filter stops the grind from being sucked into your mouth.​
More info on Bripe or to see it in action, visit here.