Homes

A cottage on a cliff inspired by the Stealth Bomber

Simon Frigon has been honing his cottage-building skills for two decades, constructing his first cottage on Lac St-Pierre when he was in his early 20s. Since then, he has built and sold four more
cottages on this very lake, each one more complex than the last. This lake house, dubbed Cliffhanger Stealth, is his fifth cottage, the culmination of all he has learned to date. Sleek and sculpted, it perches atop a west-facing granite outcrop, simultaneously blending in and standing out.

Photo by Justin Van Leeuwen

The CEO of property-restoration firm cdrg+RedTeam, Simon sees each cottage project as a creative outlet that allows him to spend time at Lac St-Pierre. He has been connected with this lake
all his life — his late grandparents had a cottage here, as have his parents and uncles. That’s why he jumped at the chance to own this property with its breathtaking vistas. “The guy sold it to me cheap. He said, ‘You can’t build on this lot.’ And I said, ‘I’ll take it because I know I can.’ ”

Photo by Justin Van Leeuwen

Simon studied the rock face and visualized how he would nestle the cottage in its contours. He drew up a plan whereby the main living spaces are divided by a courtyard, the rooms angled outward
to frame views of the lake. The entire structure is anchored into the surrounding granite.

Left: The cubby was originally designed as a straight wall, but Simon saw the possibility for a reading nook and the builders designed it on the fly. Pendant lights are by Daikon Studio. Right: The kitchen is modern in tone but warmed by wood. Floor-to-ceiling windows are framed with B.C. fir, while the wide-plank flooring was sourced from Sweden and the ceilings are painted spruce. Photos by Justin Van Leeuwen
Photos by Justin Van Leeuwen

Inspired by the Stealth Bomber, a sleek military aircraft, the exterior pairs matte zinc roof tiles with slate-grey Maibec siding. Inside, the pleasure is in the details — floor-to-ceiling windows framed with B.C. fir, oiled wide-plank floors, dramatic lighting, and subtle grey walls and ceilings that almost seem to undulate. It took three years to complete, but Simon and his family are finally living on the edge — which is exactly where they want to be.